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Article

Catégorie : Evénements scientifiques

Vendredi 24 mai 2019 : Séminaire de Pardis MOHAMMADPOUR : Developing Solidification Microstructure Selection Maps in the frame of Additive Manufacturing

L'Institut Jean Lamour invite Pardis MOHAMMADPOUR, doctorante à l'Université McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, qui donnera un séminaire sur le thème :

"Developing Solidification Microstructure Selection Maps in the frame of Additive Manufacturing"

 

Date et lieu :
Vendredi 24 mai 2019 à 8h30
Institut Jean Lamour
Campus Artem, Nancy
Salle 2-012

 


Abstract :
Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a promising technology to fabricate complex geometries that are otherwise impossible through conventional manufacturing routes. Understanding microstructural development in additive manufacturing is critical due to the non-equilibrium cooling conditions and the consequent effects on mechanical properties of the final component. The resulting non-equilibrium cooling conditions lead to a variety of microstructures which consequently result in a wide range of mechanical properties. Understanding the melt thermal conditions, alloy chemistry, and thermodynamic properties during the rapid solidification in AM process will aid in reducing unwanted variability in material properties and even enable the design of specific microstructural features to suit a given application. The creation of Solidification Microstructure Selection (SMS) Maps using the analytical growth models can be computationally efficient in comparison with more complex approaches such as phase field and cellular automata for microstructure prediction. Here, I will discuss on the simple but effective theoretical solidification models to evaluate their ability to predict of microstructural features in additive manufacturing applications. The potential of this method in microstructural predictions for additively manufactured products, as well as outstanding challenges and limitations, will be discussed.